Wednesday, March 07, 2007

7 March: Gaviscon again

Do you get bored with the adverts on TV?

It gets quite exciting when there's a new one - is it a car (special effects), perfume (monochrome orgasms), washing powder (improbable story), or another poor soul with inexplicable rust in the W.C. pan?

Why do they advertise something to soften stools at tea-time? And those bloody women with their digestive discomfort - they need a good slap and being told to eat less, and more slowly.

And what do "pre-biotic" and "pro-biotic" mean, anyway?
*rustling of dictionary pages*
"Pre" means before; ignoring the meaning of "pro" as professional or a prostitute, the other meanings are in favour of, acting as a substitute for, forwards, or in front of. Then "biotic" means relating to life or living things, or of biological origin.

So put together, we get pre-biotic = before relating to life. And pro-biotic = acting as a substitute for relating to living things.

Not something I would want to eat.

Especially as pro-biotic is almost certainly the opposite of anti-biotic.

3 comments:

Judith said...

I have been going through exactly the same thought processes over pre- and pro-biotic. Another of my pet hates is: "clinically proven to.." do whatever they want to claim it does. So much of it seems so transparently rubbish that one wonders they have the face to put it up on our screens.

Besides, as far as these biotics are concerned, I am still relying on the constitution I inherited, reinforced by a sensible upbringing, which seem to have left me with a digestion which manages OK without all these new mysteries. Lucky me!

Murph said...

Stool softening and bloated feelings has Mr P. shouting at the TV. These advertising types must go home to their family at night and be slightly embarrassed when their children ask "What did you do at work today Daddy?".

stitchwort said...

Oh, yes, Judith, *proven* is a word seldom heard outside adverts.

murph, I forget, Mr. P. doesn't work in advertising, does he?